ZEN TIGER MARTIAL ARTS

FAQ

Zen Tiger Martial Arts - Location

 

Where does the name Moh Pai Hu Shih come from?

What is Kempo Kung Fu?

Do you train the 5 Animals?

Do you train weapons?

Do you train grappling or ground defense?

What is Xing Yi Quan?

 

Where does the name Moh Pai Hu Shih come from?

Moh Pai (Bai) Hu Shih literally translated means White Tiger Temple System or what we like to call Moh Tiger Kempo. It is a combination of the two separate names Grand Master O. E. Simon used to describe his styles: Moh Pai and Pai Hu Shih; mostly the 'phonetic' Mandarin pronunciations of pinyin characters.

'Moh' represents the 'Temple' and is a loosely veiled reference to DaMo (Bodhidharma) who according to legend was the founder of 'enlightened' martial arts, combining Ch'an (Zen) Buddhism with Chinese boxing (Gung Fu) and introducing it to the monks at the fabled Sil Lum (Shao Lin) Temple. 'Pai' means 'Clan/Sect/School'. So GM Simon's Moh Pai literally translated means 'DaMo Clan of Martial Arts'!

Now of course our style is NOT a classical style of wushu from the Shaolin Temple, this is just the name GM Simon gave to his concept of combining Ch'an philosophy with his own fighting style. What he called the Moh 'Temple' system.

The phonetic 'Pai Hu Shih' (白虎式) literally translated means 'White Tiger Style' with the character being mispronounced (Either mistakenly or on purpose). It's correct pronunciation is 'Bai'.

Put it all together and you have the White Tiger Temple System or Moh Pai (Bai) hu Shih.

 

What is Kempo Kung Fu?

The word Kempo (Kenpō) is a Japanese translation of the Chinese word 'Ch'uan Fa' or 'way of the fist' which is a generic term simply meaning martial arts.

Kempo is considered by many to be one of the first mixed or 'hybrid' martial arts. Today there are many different styles of kempo, most a varying mix of Chinese Kung Fu with Japanese styles like Karate, Jujitsu and, Aikido. Kempo's history traditionally traces it's roots back through the Mitose family to the fabled Shaolin Temple.

So in many ways calling a style Kempo Kung Fu is redundant as Kempo by definition already contains Chinese Kung Fu, but because most people instantly recognize the meaning of Kung Fu while many are not familiar with the term Kempo and because of the additional Chinese Kung Fu influences within our style, we choose to use both.

 

Do you train the 5 Animals?

The style of Moh Pai Kempo Kung Fu only has two named animal forms: Dragon & Tiger. So from a purely Chinese (forms driven) Kung-Fu point of view, it is not a complete 5 Animal style. Therfore a better definition of Grand Master Simon's style might be to call it 'Tiger-Dragon' Kempo Kung Fu.

However all 5 animals (Tiger, Leopard, Snake, Crane, Dragon), are present throughout many of the forms within the Moh System and from a Kempo (Technique driven), point of view, the 5 animals are a core part of the applications within Moh Pai and Pai Hu Shih. Of course the animal styles within MPKK and PHS are GM Simon's own interpretation and may not be the same as traditional sets or motions found in classical Chinese styles. You can find a good description of how the 5 Animals work within Moh Pai here.

 

Do you train weapons?

Yes. Our training of weapons takes a twofold approach.

First we train several traditional Asian martial arts weapons for spiritual growth and to maintain the ways of the past. The weapons we train include the bow staff, spear and sword.

Secondly we train a comprehensive set of weapons defenses, primarily against knives. These are based on the core techniques of Grand Master Simon's Moh 'Temple' System and Pai Hu Shih. This is not 'knife fighting', but learning to defend against multiple attackers and individuals who carry concealed weapons, most commonly bladed or edged weapons.

 

Do you train grappling or ground defense?

Yes. Though Moh Pai is predominantly an upright striking style it does include a full set of throws, catches, locks and take downs. We also train counters to take downs and basic defenses if you are thrown or pinned to the ground so that you can deal with this situation as efficiently as possible and immediately get back on your feet.

 

What is Xing Yi Quan?

Xing Yi Quan is commonly referred to as 'Form and Mind' boxing and is one of three major internal (Taoist) martial arts, the others being Taiji Quan and Ba Gua Zhang. It was originally based on the Six Harmonies: Three external (The hands harmonize the feet/ The shoulders harmonize with the hips/ The elbows harmonize with the knees), and three internal (The heart harmonizes with the intent/ The intent harmonizes with the qi/ The qi harmonizes with the power).

The study of Xingyi is a great choice for any experienced 'external' martial artist wishing to learn more about the internal arts. Though Xingyi is often trained slowly in single person sets, it's linear training patterns lend itself well to external stylists and in application it is a very aggressive style where one uses a strong offense to take out an opponent as quickly and efficiently as possible.

At Zen Tiger Martial Arts we teach an introduction to this style including a focus on how to stand properly (San Ti), the individual movements and linking sets of the Five Fists (Metal/ Splitting, Wood/ Smashing, Water/ Drilling, Fire/ Pounding & Earth/ Crossing) followed by the individual phases and linking forms for Spear and Sword.

Though we are also familiar with the 12 Animal phases and other internal sets, for any of our students who wish to pursue XingYi further we highly recommend they find a teacher or school committed solely to the training of internal martial arts like Master Shouyu Liang in Vancouver, BC.

 

For more information please contact us HERE.

Zen Tiger Martial Arts - Kwan Kung

 

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